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College, Career, and Civic Readiness

Integrating Technology into Community Youth Research

Increasingly youth development programs are exploring how to integrate technology into their activities. In this issue brief, researchers from SRI International describe a joint project with the Gardner Center aimed at using technology to give youth more active roles in data collection and analysis. This work draws on a collaborative partnership that explored how new technology might be introduced to support the community youth research process of the Youth Engaged in Leadership and Learning project.

PASS-2: Putting Youth Contribution at the Center of Positive Youth Development in Oakland High Schools

Positive youth development literature suggests that adults can create settings that support youth development across five foundational dimensions: competence, confidence, connection, character, and caring, and this, in turn, will enable youth to develop a sixth dimension: contribution. During the 2011-12 academic year, the Gardner Center had the opportunity to conduct an implementation study of the Peers Advising Students to Succeed (PASS-2) program run by Oakland Kids First (OKF).

Developing Early Warning Indicators for the San Francisco Unified School District

San Francisco’s Bridge to Success initiative joins the City of San Francisco, the San Francisco Unified School District, the City College of San Francisco, and community organizations to promote high school and postsecondary success for underrepresented students. Discussions between SFUSD staff and researchers from the Gardner Center led to the development of an Early Warning System to enable high schools to identify incoming ninth grade students in need of extra supports to be on track to graduate.

Youth Engaged in Leadership and Learning (YELL): A Handbook for Program Staff, Teachers, and Community Leaders

The Gardner Center initiated YELL in 2000 as a nine month, afterschool pilot-program that trained 15 eighth grade students as community researchers, advisors, and socially conscious leaders. With Gardner Center program staff, embedded researchers, school and community partners, and youth themselves contributing to program development, YELL expanded to include 350 middle school and high school youth in two Bay Area communities over the next six years. While no longer running YELL programs directly, the Gardner Center includes the YELL approach in many of its community-based projects.

Examining Students’ Math Course-Taking and Educational Outcomes in the Garden Grove Unified School District (Year 1)

Research demonstrates that students’ success in rigorous middle and high school math courses is positively associated with their admission to college, earnings later in life, and career prospects. The sequential nature of math course-taking, however, can create an opportunity structure that puts certain students at a disadvantage, specifically those from lower-income and ethnically and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Math Articulation between the San Francisco Unified School District and the City College of San Francisco

The Bridge to Success initiative convened the City and County of San Francisco, the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD), the City College of San Francisco (CCSF), and key community organizations to promote postsecondary success for underrepresented students. At the request of the initiative’s math teaching working group, the Gardner Center used the Youth Data Archive to conduct an analysis on the relationship between students’ high school math performance at SFUSD and their performance on CCSF’s math placement test for incoming students.

Math Placement Acceleration Initiative at the City College of San Francisco Developed with San Francisco Unified School District

This issue brief presents an analysis predicting students’ success in their first community college math course and explains how a placement policy created through San Francisco’s Bridge to Success (BtS) initiative acts on these results. BtS brings together the City and County of San Francisco, the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD), the City College of San Francisco (CCSF), and key community organizations to promote postsecondary success for underrepresented students.

College Readiness Indicator System (CRIS) Resource Series

School communities across the country are working hard to comply with state and federal policies requiring that all students be prepared for success in college. Technological advances and new reporting requirements make data on students and schools more accessible than ever—but more and better data alone are not enough to meet the challenges posed by the troubling opportunity and achievement gaps that keep many students from reaching their goals after high school.

Oakland Kids First: Peers Advising Students to Succeed Implementation Study

Oakland Kids First (OKF) is a nonprofit organization that informs district-level policy regarding meaningful family and student engagement and implements youth development programs serving high-school students throughout Oakland Unified School District. Peers Advising Students to Succeed (PASS-2) is OKF’s peer academic advising program that trains older students to teach freshmen about high school graduation and college-eligibility requirements through workshops and mentoring.

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